Breaking: Legendary Reverend Billy Graham Dead At 99


America’s Most Beloved Reverend Has Gone Home To Be With The Lord





Billy Graham, one of the world’s most famous Christian evangelists, has died, a family spokesman said today. He was 99.

Graham died at his home this morning, the spokesman said.

Graham retired to his mountain home at Montreat, N.C., in 2005 after nearly six decades on the road calling people to Christ at 417 all-out preaching and musical events from Miami to Moscow. His final New York City crusade in 2005 was sponsored by 1,400 regional churches from 82 denominations.

Presidents called on Graham in their dark hours, and uncounted millions say he showed them the light. He took his Bible to the ends of the Earth in preaching tours he called “crusades.” Even now, anywhere a satellite, radio, TV, video or podcast can reach, his sonorous voice is probably still calling someone to Christ.

Billy Graham delivers a sermon at age 27. (Photo: Billy Graham Evangelistic Association)

Though Graham’s shoes could likely never be filled, his son, Franklin, has taken over in some aspects—leading The Billy Graham Evangelistic Association and becoming a confidant of President Donald Trump, including speaking at his inauguration.

But Franklin’s message has swayed from his father’s, leaving a mixed legacy for the Graham name.

Franklin has mocked both Islam and LGBT rights. He uses his following on social media to raise funds for “persecuted Christians,” boycotts businesses that use gay couples in advertisements and blasts the separation of church and state as as the godless successor to Cold War communism.

But his father’s words for years offered peace and perspective.

On the National Day of Prayer and Remembrance following the 9/11 attacks, Billy Graham spoke of the “mystery of iniquity and evil,” of “the lesson of our need for each other” and, ultimately, of hope.

“He was so real, he made Christianity come true.” observed Susan Harding, an anthropologist at the University of California-Santa Cruz. “He was homespun, historical and newsworthy all at once. He could span the times from Christ to today, from the globe to you, all in one sentence.”

Grant Wacker, a Duke University professor of Christian history, says Graham represented, “what most decent churchgoing people thought and ought to think.”

His reputation was untouched by sex or financial scandals. When anti-Semitic comments came to light as transcripts of conversations with Richard Nixon surfaced, Graham was promptly and deeply apologetic.

He never built a megachurch, set up a relief agency, launched a political lobby or ran for office. Yet he redefined American Protestant life by popularizing Christianity’s core message — Christ died for your sins — downplaying denominational details and proclaiming the joys found in faith.

Graham was, however, drawn to power. Eventually, he met, prayed with, comforted and joked with 12 U.S. presidents, and Graham learned to walk a tightrope.

He found a fine balance that allowed him to become America’s pastor, Democrat or Republican. North or South.


About Liberty Queen

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *